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Consumption Pattern of Coloured Broiler Birds in Karnataka

Jagadeeswary Vankayala Lavanya Ramalingia Satyanarayan Kamardi Narasimhamurthy H. N. Shilpa Shree J.
Vol 7(3), 10-15
DOI- http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/ijlr.20170215041820

India's poultry industry has transformed from a mere backyard activity into a major commercial activity. The present study was undertaken to study the consumption pattern of coloured broiler birds in Karnataka with a total sample of 90 consumers selected randomly. The study revealed that majority (96.67%) of the respondents preferred coloured broiler meat because of taste. Majority of the respondents lived in small family (88.89%) and decision making regarding consumption was predominated by males (68.89%). Majority of the respondent’s household consumed 1.5 - 4 Kgs meat per time and spent 75-349 rupees to purchase coloured broiler meat at a time. Nearly half of the consumers consumed coloured broiler meat once in a fortnight and majority (70.00%) of the respondents had an average consumption of 1 - 14 kgs coloured broiler meat /month /household. Majority (53.34%) of the respondents had per capita consumption of 3-13 Kg per year and most (44.45%) of them preferred curry as utilization product. Most of the respondents expressed price and tenderness as the major reasons for consuming coloured broiler chicken. The respondents have ranked the native bird as first and highly preferred meat followed by coloured broiler meat. All the respondents preferred to eat coloured broiler meat in winter followed by monsoon, rainy season and summer. Consumption preference was positive towards coloured broiler farmers.


Keywords : Consumption Pattern Coloured Broiler Consumer Preference Karnataka

Introduction

India’s poultry industry has transformed from a mere backyard activity into a major commercial activity. India, the world’s second largest developing country, is contributing to the expansion of the poultry sector through its rapid growth. In India, poultry sector growth is being driven by rising income, together with the emergence of vertically integrated poultry producers that have reduced consumer prices by lowering production and marketing costs (Mohanraj and Manivannan, 2012). Poultry in agriculture segment is one of the fastest growing sectors in India with an average growth rate of 6 per cent in egg production and 12 per cent for broiler production per annum (Karthikeyan and Nedunchezhian, 2013). Marketing plays a vital role in connecting producers and consumers. Efficient marketing of a produce is crucial for existence of any enterprise and the economic motive behind that is the profit which could be achieved again through efficient marketing. In Karnataka marketing is still the weakest link and no poultry based marketing structure has been evolved in the state. Day old coloured broiler chicks are being produced and distributed by department of Poultry Science, Veterinary College, Bengaluru under All India Co-ordinated Research Project on poultry breeding for meat since 20 years all over Karnataka. Still there is a dearth for information regarding consumption pattern and preference for coloured broiler birds in Karnataka. Hence the present study was undertaken to assess the consumption pattern in marketing of coloured broiler birds in Karnataka.

Materials and Methods

The present study was conducted in Karnataka using exploratory research design. Ninety consumers of coloured broiler birds were selected randomly to collect information on consumption pattern and their preference towards coloured broiler birds. Using pretested structured interview schedule, the respondents were personally interviewed and the data were collected. The data were presented in tables expressed by frequency and percentage.

Result and Discussion

The consumption pattern of coloured broilers in Karnataka was depicted in the Table 1. From the study it was revealed that majority (96.67%) of the respondents preferred coloured broiler meat because of taste followed by no specific reason for preference (4.44%) and preferred due to easy availability (2.23%).These findings were in line with findings of Srinivasa and Thammiraju(2010) and Thammiraju and Suryanarayana (2005). Majority of the respondents lived in small family (88.89%) followed by large (6.66%) and medium family (4.45%). All members in the family were consuming coloured broiler meat. Decision making regarding consumption of coloured broiler meat was predominated by males (68.89%). Majority (24.45%) of the respondents household consumed 4 Kg meat per time followed by 3Kg (23.34%), 1.5Kg (17.78%), 2Kg (10.00%), 8Kg (5.56%) and equal (4.45%) percentage of the respondents consumed 1Kg, 2.5 Kg and 5 Kg coloured broiler’s meat. Majority (65.56%) of the respondents spent 75-349 rupees, 27.78 per cent of the respondents spent 350-624 rupees and 6.66 per cent of the respondents spent 625-900 rupees to purchase coloured broiler meat at a time. With respect to frequency of consumption, 48.89 per cent of the respondents consumed coloured broiler’s meat once in a fortnight, 43.34 per cent of the respondents consumed once in a week and only 7.77 per cent of the respondents consumed once in a month. These findings were partially in line with findings of Thammiraju and Suryanarayana (2005) who revealed the respondents under their study were consuming chicken twice in a fortnight. Majority (70.00%) of the respondents had an average consumption of 1- 14 kgs coloured broiler meat /month /household and 23.34 per cent of the respondents consumed 14-27 kgs and 6.67 per cent of the respondents consumed 27 – 40 kgs of coloured broiler meat. Majority (67.78%) of the respondents spent 75-1249 rupees for purchasing coloured broiler meat/household followed by 1250-2424 rupees/household (25.56%) and 2425-3600 rupees/household (6.67%). These findings were partially in line with findings of Nagarajakumari et al. (2011) who reported that the consumption was higher at households with an investment of 151-200 rupees per month, preference owing towards festivals and occasions. Majority (53.34%) of the respondents had per capita consumption of 3-13 Kgs per year followed by 14-24 Kgs (32.23%) and 25-36 Kgs (14.45%).

Majority (44.45%) of the respondents preferred curry as utilization product followed by biryani (27.78%), fry (22.23%) and kheema (5.56%). Cent percentage of the respondents expressed they were consuming coloured broiler chicken for taste and digestibility followed by easy access (94.45%) and nutritional quality (88.89%). Equal (77.78%) percentage of the respondents expressed price and tenderness as the reasons for consuming coloured broiler chicken followed by as a tradition in festivals (66.67%), easy cooking and influence of friends/ suggestion of friends and relatives (55.56% each) appearance (44.45%) and fat (33.34%). Analysing the preference ranking of meat, the respondents had ranked the native bird (rank 1) as highly preferred meat followed by coloured broiler meat (rank 2), Giriraja meat (rank 3), Swarnadhara meat (rank 4), commercial broiler meat (rank 5), mutton (Rank 6), fish (rank 7), other poultry birds (rank 8) and pork (rank 9). In households that preferred chicken as a first option, the most important factors that affected the preferences of chicken meat consumption were price suitability, taste, nutritional value, health circumstances, fat rates, and ease of preparation, respectively. All the respondents preferred to eat coloured broiler meat in winter followed by monsoon, rainy season and summer.

Table 1: Consumption pattern of coloured broilers in Karnataka

S. No Particulars F %
1 Preference
Taste 87 96.67
Easily available 2 2.23
No specific reason 1 4.44
2 Total no. of members consuming F %
4-10 small 80 88.89
11-17 medium 4 4.45
18-25 large 6 6.66
3 Decision makers in family
Male 62 68.89
Female 15 16.67
Children 13 14.44
4 Total consumption/ household/time
1 4 4.45
1.5 16 17.78
2 9 10
2.5 4 4.45
3 21 23.34
3.5 2 2.23
4 22 24.45
5 4 4.45
6 2 2.23
8 5 5.56
10 1 1.11
5 Total expenditure/household/time in rupees
75-349 59 65.56
350-624 25 27.78
625-700 6 6.66
6 Frequency of consumption
Daily
Once in a week 39 43.34
Once in a fortnight 44 48.89
Once in a month 7 7.77
Occasionally
7 Average quantity consumed /month/household in Kgs
1-14 63 70
14 – 27 21 23.34
27-40 6 6.67
8 Average expenditure/household in rupees
75-1249 61 67.78
1250-2424 23 25.56
2425-3600 6 6.67
9 Per capita consumption (Kg/ year)
3-13 48 53.34
14-24 29 32.23
25-36 13 14.45
10 Utilization product
Curry 40 44.45
Fry 20 22.23
Biriyani 25 27.78
Kheema 5 5.56
11 Reasons for preference
Followed by ancestors
Family tradition
For nutritional quality 80 88.89
For taste 90 100.00
For tenderness 70 77.78
For fat content 30 33.34
Appearance 40 44.45
Digestibility 90 100.00
Easy for cooking 50 55.56
Due to Price 70 77.78
Due to easy accessibility 85 94.45
As a tradition in festivals 60 66.67
Influence / suggestion of friends/ relatives 50 55.67
12 Type of Meat Rank
Native birds meat 1
Coloured broiler meat 2
Giriraja meat 3
Swarnadara meat 4
Commercial broiler meat 5
Mutton 6
Fish 7
Other Poultry birds 8
Pork 9
Beef 10
13 Season
Winter 1
Monsoon 2
Rainy season 3
Summer 4

Conclusion

The present study on consumption pattern of coloured broiler birds revealed that majority of the respondents preferred coloured broiler meat because of taste and digestibility. All members in the family were consuming coloured broiler’s meat with the per capita consumption of 3-13 Kg per year. Most of the respondents expressed price and tenderness as the major reasons for consuming coloured broiler chicken. The respondents had ranked the native bird as first and highly preferred meat followed by coloured broiler meat. Consumption preference was positive towards coloured broiler farmers. Steps to be taken for providing marketing information to the coloured broiler farmers for getting remunerative price, a forum can be recommended to discuss the marketing problems and popularization of coloured broiler birds can be undertaken through mass media.

References

  1. Karthikeyan R and Nedunchezhian VR. 2013. Vertical integration paving way to organised retailing in Indian poultry industry. International Journal of Business and Management Invention. 2(1): 39-46
  2. Mohanraj R and Manivannan L. 2012. A study on satisfaction level and problems faced by poultry farm owners with special reference to Namakkal district, Tamilnadu. International Journal of Management, IT and Engineering, 2(3): 1-34.
  3. Nagarajakumari K, Naga Mallika E and Ananda Reddy P. 2011. Consumption pattern of chicken meat and meat products in rural areas of coastal Andhra Pradesh districts. Indian J. Poult. Sci., 46(1): 132 -134.
  4. Srinivasa RM and Thammiraju D. 2010. Meat consumption pattern in Hyderabad city. Indian J. Anim. Res., 44(4): 248 – 253.
  5. Thammiraju D and Suryanarayana MVAN. 2005. Meat consumption in Prakasam district of Andhra Pradesh: an analysis. Livest. Res. Rural Dev., 17(11): Article #130
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