NAAS Score 2020

                   5.36

UserOnline

Free counters!

Previous Next

Training Needs of Beneficiaries under Mini Kamdhenu Dairy Scheme (MKDS) in Lucknow Mandal of Uttar Pradesh

Jitendra Pratap Mahesh Chander Sanjay Kumar Ajay Kumar Chaturvedani Jayant Goyal
Vol 7(9), 61-68
DOI- http://dx.doi.org/10.5455/ijlr.20170710033436

The study was conducted over 93 beneficiaries in Lucknow Mandal of Uttar Pradesh under Mini Kamdhenu Dairy Scheme (MKDS) to identify training needs in various areas of organised dairy farming. In order to identify training needs of beneficiaries, the responses of individual beneficiary were recorded on four point continuum as most needed, needed, least needed and not needed with respective scores 4, 3, 2 and 1 by pre tested structured interview schedule. Further, total weighted mean was calculated for each aspect by adding up frequencies and multiplied with respective continuum scores. Finally, ranks were given on the basis of total weighted mean score. The study revealed that majority of MKDS beneficiaries (63.4%) perceived training needs on bio-security as most needed, followed by feed and feeding management (59.1%), health care (58.1%), calf management (33.3%) and breed selection and identification of quality dairy animal (36.6%) were equally ranked as IV. Majority of respondents (47.5%) perceived marketing as needed, followed by clean milk production (38.7%), housing management (25.8%) and finance (16.1%) with rank V, VI, VII and VIII respectively.


Keywords : Beneficiary MKDS Perceived Training Needs

Introduction

The rapid growth of milk production in India has been mainly because of the increase in the number of animals rather than that of improved productivity (Patil et al., 2009) yet among livestock enterprises, dairy is the most ancient occupation established in the rural setting of Uttar Pradesh. Dairy sector contributes significantly in generating employment opportunities and supplementing the income but availability of quality germplasm is very less in the state. In order to overcome the low availability of high yielding germplasm animals, the government of Uttar Pradesh has launched interest free Mini Kamdhenu Dairy Scheme (MKDS) in 2013-14, which envisage establishment of dairy units of 50 high yielding animals procured outside the state. Beneficiaries of this scheme were newly involved in organised dairy farming and training is necessary to provide a constant support of recent technological knowledge to farmers (Pharate et al., 2010), so the training needs of selected beneficiaries must be known to policy maker because identification of training needs help in suitable modification of training programme to meet the training objectives (Lal et al., 2005).

Training in organised dairy farming practices is considered as an important input in increasing the knowledge and skill of MKDS beneficiaries and to make the dairy unit self-sufficient and viable. It is necessary to update their knowledge and skill at regular intervals in the concerned task areas through systematic and continuous training programmes. It is obvious that any training programme, to be effective, should be based on the needs of MKDS beneficiaries which should be determined with the help of a systematic procedure and spelled out accurately for the guidance of those who benefited from the training programmes. Keeping this view in forefront, the study was carried out with the objective of identifying the perceived training needs of MKDS beneficiaries in the subject areas of milk and milk products and dairy animal production and management.

Materials and Method

The study was purposively carried out in Lucknow Mandal based on its highest dairy animal population among all Mandals of Uttar Pradesh. Lucknow Mandal comprises of 6 districts, which are Hardoi, Lakhimpur Kheri, Lucknow, Rai Bareli, Sitapur and Unnao. From each of the selected districts, an exhaustive list of beneficiaries was prepared under the Mini Kamdhenu Dairy Scheme with the help of competent authority. From these listed beneficiaries, all were selected from each district, who established MKDS unit till December 2015. Hence total sample size became 93 in the survey area. Training needs as perceived by MKDS beneficiaries in nine major areas and sub-areas of dairy farming were recorded on four point continuum as most needed, needed, least needed and not needed with respective scores 4, 3, 2 and 1 by pre tested structured interview schedule. Further, total weighted mean scores were calculated for each aspect by adding up frequencies and multiplied with respective continuum scores. Finally, ranks were given on the basis of total weighted mean scores.

Result and Discussion

Training Needs of MKDS Beneficiaries in Major Areas of Dairy Farming

Training needs as perceived by MKDS beneficiaries were ascertained in nine major areas of dairy farming viz. housing management, breed selection and identification of quality animal, calf management, feed and feeding management, health care, bio-security, marketing, clean milk production and finance on the four point continuum as most needed, needed, least needed and not needed with respective scores 4, 3, 2 and 1. Frequency and percentage were calculated for each major area and ranking was done for each category based on total weighted mean score. The major training needs as perceived by MKDS beneficiaries were presented in the Table 1 and discussed below.

Table 1: Training needs of MKDS beneficiaries in major areas of dairy farming

S. No Area MN N LN NN TS TWMS Rank
1 Bio-Security 59 (63.4) 26 (28.0) 8 (8.6) 0 (0.0) 330 3.55 I
2 Health care 54 (58.1) 37 (39.8) 0 (0.0) 2 (2.1) 329 3.54 II
3 Feed and feeding management 55 (59.1) 30 (32.3) 8 (8.6) 0 (0.0) 326 3.51 III
4 Breed selection & identification of quality dairy animal 34 (36.6) 46 (49.4) 13 (14) 0 (0.0) 300 3.23 IV
5 Calf management 31 (33.3) 52 (55.9) 10 (10.8) 0 (0.0) 300 3.23 IV
6 Marketing 32 (34.4) 47 (50.5) 10 (10.8) 4 (4.3) 293 3.15 V
7 Clean milk production 36 (38.7) 33 (35.5) 24 (25.8) 0 (0.0) 291 3.12 VI
8 Housing management 24 (25.8) 35 (37.6) 30 (32.3) 4 (4.3) 265 2.85 VII
9 Finance 15 (16.1) 28 (30.1) 30 (32.3) 20 (21.5) 224 2.4 VIII

It is evident from Table 1 that majority of respondents (63.4%) perceived training need on bio-security as most needed, followed by feed and feeding management (59.1%), health care (58.1%) ranked I, III and II respectively. Calf management (33.3%) and breed selection and identification of quality dairy animal (36.6%) were equally ranked as IV. Majority of respondents (47.5%) perceived marketing as needed, followed by clean milk production (38.7%), housing management (25.8%) and finance (16.1%) with rank V, VI, VII and VIII respectively. Bio-security was the major constraint faced by the MKDS beneficiaries; as their quality animals were more prone to disease condition, they should be separated from rest of the animal group. Further, findings revealed that high cost of feed and fodder were influence the milk production pattern of dairy unit. Gour et al. (2015) revealed that feed and feeding management and health care needs were ranked II and III, respectively in Madhya Pradesh while Rani et al. (2009) also revealed similar finding. These results were little bit different from Balaraju et al. (2014) because the respondents of present study were from only organised dairy farms. It is clear from the results that majority of MKDS beneficiaries perceived each and every aspect of dairy farming as important with varying percentage because of their previous experiences in dairy farming but only 21.5 percent beneficiaries responded that there was no need of training in finance as major area. This finding might be due to high influential status of the MKDS beneficiaries in the society.

Training Needs of MKDS Beneficiaries in Sub Areas of Dairy Farming

Perceived training needs in the sub-area of each major area were also ascertained and are presented in Table 2.

Table 2: Training needs of MKDS beneficiaries in sub areas of dairy farming

S. No. Area MN N LN NN TS TWMS Rank
A Bio-Security
1 Dairy shed entry point arrangement 85 (91.4) 8 (8.6) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 364 3.91 I
2 Insect & rodent control 10 (10.8) 67 (72.0) 16 (17.2) 0 (0.0) 273 2.93 II
3 Diseases control & their symptoms 12 (12.9) 50 (53.8) 31 (33.3) 0 (0.0) 260 2.79 III
4 Dead animal and aborted foetus disposal 10 (10.8) 54 (58.1) 29 (31.1) 0 (0.0) 260 2.79 III
B Health Care
1 Ectoparasitic control 70 (75.3) 23 (24.7) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 349 3.75 I
2 Deworming 69 (74.2) 17 (18.3) 7 (7.5) 0 (0.0) 341 3.66 II
3 Vaccination 49 (52.7) 31 (33.3) 13 (14) 0 (0.0) 315 3.38 III
4 Common diseases and their preventive measures 56 (60.2) 24 (25.8) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 314 3.37 IV
5 Zoonotic diseases and its transmission 12 (12.9) 49 (52.7) 32 (34.4) 0 (0.0) 259 2.78 V
C Feeding Management
1 Balance ration feeding & its economical composition 85 (91.4) 8 (8.6) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 364 3.91 I
2 Importance of safe feed and clean drinking water 70 (75.3) 23 (24.7) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 349 3.75 II
3 Mineral mixture supplementation 56 (60.2) 23 (24.7) 14 (15.1) 0 (0.0) 321 3.45 III
4 Mineral mixture supplementation 56 (60.2) 23 (24.7) 14 (15.1) 0 (0.0) 321 3.45 III
5 Own feed preparation 49 (52.7) 31 (33.3) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 315 3.38 IV
6 Feeding of different age groups 48 (51.6) 32 (34.4) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 314 3.376 V
D Breed Selection and Identification of Quality Animal
1 Examination of dairy animal before putting in their herd 70 (75.3) 23 (24.7) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 349 3.75 I
2 Identification of quality animal 69 (74.2) 17 (18.3) 7 (7.5) 0 (0.0) 341 3.66 II
3 Sources of quality animal 49 (52.7) 31 (33.3) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 315 3.38 III
4 Selection of animal breed 49 (52.7) 31 (33.3) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 315 3.38 III
E Calf Management
1 Handling of day old calf 56 (60.2) 24 (25.8) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 322 3.46 I
2 Male calf management 10 (10.8) 67 (72.0) 16 (17.2) 0 (0.0) 273 2.93 II
3 Disbudding and castration 12 (12.9) 50 (53.8) 31 (33.3) 0 (0.0) 260 2.79 III
4 Floor space requirement for calves 10 (10.8) 54 (58.1) 29 (31.2) 0 (0.0) 260 2.79 III
5 Feeding and watering management of calves 12 (12.9) 49 (52.2) 32 (34.4) 0 (0.0) 259 2.78 IV
F Marketing
1 Different marketing channels 85 (91.4) 8 (8.6 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 364 3.91 I
2 Sources of insurance 83 (89.2) 10 (10.8) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 362 3.89 II
3 Seasonal fluctuation in demand and price of milk 10 (10.8) 67 (72.0) 16 (17.2) 0 (0.0) 273 2.93 III
G Clean Milk Production
1 Sources of contamination 71 (76.3) 22 (23.7) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 350 3.76 I
2 Procedure for clean milk production 54 (58.1) 26 (28.0) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 320 3.44 II
3 Clean milk quality 13 (14.0) 48 (51.6) 32 (34.4) 0 (0.0) 260 2.79 III
H Housing Management
1 Litter management 70 (75.3) 23 (24.7) 0 (0.0) 0 (0.0) 349 3.75 I
2 Distance among different building of dairy shed 68 (73.1) 19 (20.4) 6 (6.5) 0 (0.0) 341 3.66 II
3 Space requirement for animal feeder & water tank 56 (60.2) 24 (24.7) 14 (15.1) 0 (0.0) 324 3.48 III
4 Arrangement in relation to weather adjustment 48 (51.6) 32 (34.4) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 314 3.37 IV
5 Construction of low cost scientific housing 47 (50.5) 33 (35.5) 13 (14.0) 0 (0.0) 313 3.36 V
I Finance
1 Government supported policy for dairy animal rearing 25 (26.9) 60 (64.5) 8 (8.6) 0 (0.0) 296 3.18 I
2 Institutional finance 18 (19.4) 51 (54.8) 24 (25.8) 0 (0.0) 273 2.93 II
3 Sources of finance 18 (19.4) 51 (54.8) 24 (25.8) 0 (0.0) 273 2.93 II

Bio-Security

An overwhelming majority of MKDS beneficiaries (91.4%) perceived dairy shed entry point arrangement as most needed with I rank, while 72.0 percent respondents showed training needs in insect & rodent control and 58.1 percent in dead animal and aborted foetus disposal as needed with II, III rank respectively.

Health Care

Majority of MKDS beneficiaries (75.3 %) perceived ectoparasitic control as most needed with I rank, followed by deworming (74.2%), common diseases and their preventive measures (60.2%), vaccination (52.7%) with rank II, III, and IV respectively. 52.7 percent respondents were perceived zoonotic diseases and its transmission as needed and ranked last in the health aspect.

Feeding Management

An overwhelming majority of MKDS beneficiaries (91.4%) perceived balance ration feeding & its economical composition as most needed with rank I, followed by importance of safe feed and clean drinking water (75.2% II rank), mineral mixture supplementation (60.2, rank III), own feed preparation (52.7% rank IV) and feeding of different age groups ranked V. These results were in lined with Patil et al. (2009) who found that majority of the respondents (54.67%) conveyed their opinion regarding training need about feeding and management of animals as the most important. These results were also in lined with Jacob et al. (2013) studied in Palakkad district of Kerala.

Breed Selection and Identification of Quality Animal

Majority of MKDS beneficiaries (74.2%) perceived examination of dairy animal before putting into their herd as most needed with first rank, followed by identification of quality animal (II rank) and equally III rank to other two remaining aspect. Introduction of new animal into dairy unit is very crucial because, it might be led to spread of communicable diseases in the animal herd. So, proper examination of dairy animal was very important step to control the animal diseases.

Calf Management

Majority of MKDS beneficiaries (60.2%, rank I) perceived training needs in the area of handling of day old calf. This finding might be due to most of beneficiaries’ undergone organised dairy farming first time. Seventy two percent respondents were showed their training needs for male calf management as needed, followed by disbudding and castration, floor space requirement for calves were equally ranked III, while only 52.2 percent respondents perceived feeding and watering management of calves as needed and ranked IV. Almost similar finding was obtained by Kathiriya et al. (2014) in the study area of Rajkot district in Gujarat state.

Marketing

An overwhelming majority of MKDS beneficiaries (91.4%) perceived different marketing channels as most needed with I rank, followed by source of insurance (89.2% rank II), while 72 percent respondents told seasonal fluctuation in demand and price of milk as needed and ranked last in marketing aspect of dairy farming.

Clean Milk Production

Majority of MKDS beneficiaries (76.3%) perceived sources of contamination as most needed with I rank, followed by procedure for clean milk production (58.1% II rank), while 51.6 percent respondents considered clean milk quality as needed with III rank.

Housing Management

Majority of MKDS beneficiaries (75.3%) felt their training needs for litter management as most needed which provide comfort to dairy animal, followed by distance among different building of dairy shed (73.1%), space requirement for animal feeder & water tank (60.2%), arrangement in relation to weather adjustment (51.6%) and construction of low cost scientific housing (50.5%) with rank I, II, III, IV, and V respectively.

Finance

Majority of MKDS beneficiaries (64.5%) perceived government supported policy for dairy animal rearing as needed with I rank followed by institutional finance and sources of finance with equal percent (54.8%) and ranked II.

ConclusionThe findings of the study indicate that all MKDS beneficiaries showed training needs in all related aspect of dairy farming. Training needs on bio-security followed by health care, feed and feeding management, calf management, breed selection, identification of quality dairy animals, marketing, clean milk production, housing management and finance was needed by the beneficiaries. Training programmes and informal information requirement in areas must be considered priority.

References

 1.    Balaraju BL,  Khandekar P,   Chander M and  Devi L. 2014 . Perceived training needs of livestock farmers in Karnataka.  Journal of Veterinary Science & Technology. 5:3.

2.    Gour S, Mandal MK and Singh R. 2015. Training needs assessment of tribal farmers of Madhya Pradesh in animal husbandry practices. Veterinary Clinical Science.

3.    Jacob SK and George A. 2013. Assessing the training need of dairy farmers on scientific cattle management practices.  International Journal of Science and Research.  2:7: 496-97.

4.    Kathiriya JB, Saradava DA, Sanepara DP and Kabaria BB. 2014. Training needs of dairy farming women and constraints faced by rural women: a case study of Gujarat. International Journal of Agricultural Sciences and Veterinary Medicine. 2:2.

5.    Lal B, Chauhan JPS.  and Das BC. 2005. Training needs of farmers on improved dairy farming practices. Journal of Dairying, Foods and. Home Sciences 24: 2 : 153 – 154.

6.    Patil AP, Gawande SH, Gobade MR and Nande MP. 2009. Training needs of dairy farmers in Nagpur district. Veterinary World. 2. 5: 187-190.

7.    Pharate DN., Shinde SB. and Sonawane HP. 2010. Training needs and participation of     farmers in dairy management. Agriculture. Update. 5.3-4: 271-273.

8. Rani VD and Subhadra MR. 2009. Training needs of farm women in dairy farming. Veterinary World. 2.6: 221-223

 

Full Text Read : 1941 Downloads : 307
Previous Next

Open Access Policy

Close